Regarding Promotions and the Election of Thomas Jefferson

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CollectionIndiana Historical Society Library: Samuel Vance Papers view image
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Date October 17, 1800
Author Name Caleb Swan (primary) Location: Washington
Recipient Name William Simmons (primary)
Summary Discusses the difficulty of keeping paymasters due to frequent promotion, and steps he has taken to try and remedy the situation. Also discusses the likely election of Thomas Jefferson. He doubts the rumors of vast changes in military operations when Jefferson takes office.
Document Format Draft Fragment
Document Notes 4 page fragment. Recipient assignment based on internal evidence.
Content Notes [not available]
Related Persons/Groups Caleb Swan; Samuel Dexter; McCall; paymasters; deputies; General James Wilkinson; Thomas Jefferson; navy; army; Cushing; slaves; southern people; ;
Related Places Washington; Ohio; Muskerigwa; Sciota; Philadelphia; ;
Keywords destination of the officers; select officers; frequent promotion; accounts; election; government; complete change; recruiting service; recruiting; negro insurrections; slave rebellion; ;
Key Phrases But there is one other matter of yet more serious importance to him, to me, to you and all honest men. I mean the certain change in the administration of our government. Mr. Jefferson's election is counted upon now as a certain event and I believe it will take place, indeed I have been of the opinion for a year past, I am now confirmed in it. When this takes place it is suggested by such men, that a complete change will be made of all the ministry-head of departments, that the navy will be hauled up and the army disbanded, our foreign minister called home, our domestic arrangement of officers generally new modelled...but for my own part I do not foresee so universal a change. The four great departments, must exist, the heads may be superseded. But I do not believe the new governors will refine so deeply a system as to change the interior order of things, which has undoubtedly been founded in nature wisdom, and executed with perhaps as much honesty as as commonly falls to the lot of human nature.
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