Transcriptions closed on May 15, 2018. Read more details here.

Cruel Murder of Two Cherokees

Sources & Images
Source Name Image(s)
CollectionNew York Public Library: Timothy Pickering Papers view image
Document Information
Date April 20, 1797
Author Name James McHenry (primary) Location: War Office
Recipient Name John Sevier (primary)
Summary McHenry assures Governor Sevier that he and the President cherish peace on the frontier and therefore insist that the intruders on Indian land be made to obey the law. The President will augment the military force on the frontier so as to prevent mutual encroachments by citizens and by Indians. The Governor is expected to take immediate steps to bring the murderers of two Cherokees to trial.
Document Format Letter Signed
Document Notes Cited in Sevier to McHenry, 06/06/1797.
Content Notes [not available]
Related Persons/Groups John Sevier; James McHenry; original offenders; intruders upon the Indian land; citizens of the State of Tennessee; Cherokee Nation; the President [Washington]; ;
Related Places War Office; Tennessee; frontiers; ;
Keywords mutual encroachments; general tranquility; accounts arrived that two of the Cherokees had been cruelly murdered; peace; removal of the settlers; operations of the government; attachment to order; preservation of peace; point of justice and policy; just reproach upon our people laws and government; Indian land; peaceable removal therefrom; dutiful obedience to the laws; permanency; necessity of removing; orders to augment the military force; peace of the frontiers; laws; observation to the President; profound tranquility; good will observed; ;
Key Phrases I have the utmost confidence in your attachment to order and the preservation of peace and confidently rely upon your taking the most immediate and decisive steps to have the original offenders secured and brought to a fair and impartial trial;
Transcription

[Note: Transcriptions are works in progress and maybe partial. Please help us correct any errors or omissions by signing up for a transcription account.]
20th April 1979
Secretary of War
[stamp:]
PRESENTED BY
J. PIERPONT MORGAN.
FORD COLLECTION.
Duplicate
War Office 20 April 1797
Sir
I have been favoured with your letters of the 17 of January and the 24 of March Ultimo;,
As I could entertain no doubt of your sincere desire to preserve the peace of the frontiers, by all those means which your station and the laws have put in your pouwer I had made the observation to the P{resident previous to the arrival of your letters which I was happy to communicate to him this opinion, so natural and so proper, had been strengthened, besides, by the profound tranquillity which had reigned for some time past on the frontiers; by the good will observed every where in the Cherokee Nation to the people of the United States; and by the hopes I had conceived that the Intruders upon the Indian land had disposed their minds to a peaceable removal therefrom and dutiful obedience to the Laws.
Anxious to give permanency to such a state of things and to confirm the intruders in the necessity of removing, the President had given orders to augment the military force on the frontier and to make such dispositions of it as should in the most effectual manner protect the Citizens of the State of Tennessee, and guard against those mutual encroachments which could not fail to check its growth and interrupt the general tranquillity. -
This
5
This arrangement which appears to have been well known in Tennessee was about to be carried into execution, when accounts arrived that two of the Cherokees had been cruelly murdered by some of our Citizens. Whether the intention of this act was to disturb the peace, to create difficulties to the removal of the settlers, or to obstruct the operations of the Government on the frontiers is not necessary now to be examined. Be this as it may, I have the utmost confidence in your attachment to order and the preservation of peace, and confidently rely upon your taking the most immediate and decisive steps to have the original offenders secured and brought to a fair and impartial trial. This is absolutely necessary in point of Justice and Policy and cannot be neglected without bringing a just reproach upon our people, laws and Government.
With very great Respect
I have the honor to be
Sir
Your obedient Servant
James McHenry

His Excellency
Governor Sevier