Community Transcription – Thirty-Seven Months

May 29th, 2014

It has been thirty-seven months since we opened the War Department archives to community transcription. Even after three years, we are still receiving regular requests for transcription accounts.

Here is a snapshot of transcription activity in the last month:

As of this morning, we have 1,809 users, with approximately 16 new transcribers signed up since the last update. Those volunteer transcribers have made 12,525saves to War Department documents, which is about 67 additional edits since the last update. We also know that, on average, each document is edited about three times before it is finished. Moreover, we have had 162,982 total page views.

A wide variety of people have volunteer as transcribers, including undergraduate and graduate students, independent scholars, genealogists, veterans, and ROTC students. Transcribers include teachers at every level of education, elementary to university. Those who specified an interest or focus mentioned topics such as the early Navy, treaties with Native Americans, particular regiments, and specific regions including Long Island, the Northwestern frontier, and Georgia and Alabama. Some also expressed a general interest in contributing to transcription projects.

As always, users may still register for a transcription account.

Help complete a Transcription! Treaty of New York with the Creek Nation of Indians

May 9th, 2014

Treaty of New York with the Creek Nation of Indians

At the behest of President Washington and Henry Knox, in the summer of 1787 several Creek leaders, along with their leader Alexander McGilivray, traveled all the way to New York City for treaty talks.  The Treaty of New York was important because it represented Washington’s and Henry Knox’s more enlightened views about dealing with Indians-that is, negotiating rather than simply taking lands away.

Williams writes Knox from London on the French Revolution

Here Williams, a successful businessman and  grand nephew of Benjamin Franklin, waxes enthusiastically about the justness of the French Revolution.  His viewpoint is particularly interesting because it predates the execution of the King Louis XVI and the onset of  the so called “Reign of Terror.”

The next four documents are some of our earliest in the collection,  detailing General Nathanael Greene’s supply problems during the Southern campaigns during the Revolutionary War.  Considered by Washington one of his ablest officers, Greene went into personal debt to feed his soldiers.

General Greene’s Southern Army and problems with supply during Revolutionary War

Clothing for General Greene’s Southern Army

Procurement of Clothing for General Greene’s Southern Army

General Greene’s Report on Clothing for the Southern Army

Community Transcription – Thirty-Six Months

May 1st, 2014

It has been thirty-six months since we opened the War Department archives to community transcription – three years! We are still receiving regular requests for transcription accounts.

Here is a snapshot of transcription activity in the last month:

As of this morning, we have 1,793 users, with approximately 35 new transcribers signed up since the last update. Those volunteer transcribers have made 12,458 saves to War Department documents, which is about 178 additional edits since the last update. We also know that, on average, each document is edited about three times before it is finished. Moreover, we have had 150,842 total page views.

A wide variety of people have volunteer as transcribers, including undergraduate and graduate students, independent scholars, genealogists, veterans, preservationists, and living history practitioners. Transcribers include teachers at every level of education, elementary to university. In addition to the many transcribers in the United States who registered in the last month, we have transcribers from the United Kingdom, Canada, and Mexico. Those who specified an interest or focus mentioned topics such as the Society of the Cincinnatti, loyalists in the aftermath of the American Revolution, specific regions such as Tennessee or the tidewater area of Virginia, and diplomatic affairs both international and with native tribes.

The documents vary widely in content. Recently completed transcriptions include issues with paying the troops in Connecticut, dealing with prize ships taken by the French, and finding a location for establishing headquarters.

As we continue to move forward with the project, users may still register for a transcription account.